Alternative communications tools abound, but email’s popularity remains undimmed.

Email has been with us for decades now — for such a long time that email could be considered as “mature” a communications tool as the conventional telephone.

And yet, even as some older tools decline in use as new communications techniques emerge, email continues to be as popular as ever.

The latest confirmation of this comes from a study of ~1,000 U.S. workers conducted in September 2019 by survey research firm Propeller Insights for app developer Spike. The topline result: of the respondents who use both email and messaging apps, nearly 80% prefer email, as compared to only around 20% who prefer the messaging apps.

Not surprisingly, older workers embrace e-mail more than younger ones do — both in terms of preference and usage. Even so, e-mail reigns supreme in terms of usage across all age groups, with messaging apps, the telephone, in-person conversations and video conferencing (in that order) lagging behind.

As for male versus female respondents; their usage and preferences are roughly similar, with perhaps a feather on the scale for males in favor of email communications.

Furthermore, what comes through loud and clear from the study is that people are tired of juggling multiple channels of communication, with nearly nine in ten respondents stating that switching between apps affects their productivity adversely in one or more ways.

The following reasons were cited as contributing to their reluctance to switch between various communication and collaboration tools:

  • Makes it harder to find information: ~21%
  • Creates too many mixed communications: ~21%
  • Slows down productivity: ~18%
  • Wastes time: ~17%
  • Is a major distraction: ~13%

Related to these downsides, more than two-thirds reported that they would welcome having an app that combines all emails and messaging.

Whether or not a combo app is something that becomes available, anyone expecting email to decline precipitously as a preferred method of communications in the coming years is likely to be disappointed.

What are your practices regarding email, messaging apps and other communications methods? Are they substantially different from the Propeller survey results? Please share your thoughts with other readers.