The COVID pandemic and the race to raise digital skills.

The Coronavirus pandemic has certainly made its mark on many markets and industries – some more than others, of course. But one consequence of the events of 2020 appears to cross all industry lines. 

Because of the rapid adjustments organizations have been required to make in the way jobs are performed – borne out of necessity because of health fears, not to mention government edicts – workers have been forced to come up the digital learning curve in a big hurry in order to do their jobs properly.

This “digital upskilling” dynamic isn’t affecting only office workers.  It’s happening across the board – in the private and public sector alike. 

Simply put, digital upskilling isn’t a matter of choice.  If workers want to remain relevant — and to keep their jobs — they’re having to ramp up their digital skill-sets without delay.

Moreover, the new skills aren’t limited to the efficient use of mobile devices, digital meeting/presentation functions, cloud applications and the like.  According to LinkedIn’s recruitment data, highly in-demand skills over the past few months encompass wide-ranging and comprehensive knowledge sets such as data science, data storage, and tech support.

Not so long ago, there were “tech jobs” and “non-tech jobs.”  Now there are just “jobs” – and nearly every one of them require the people doing them to possess a high comfort level with technology.

Will things revert back to older norms with the anticipated arrival of coronavirus vaccines in 2021?  I think the chances of that are “less than zero.”  But what are your thoughts?  Please share your perspectives with other readers.

One thought on “The COVID pandemic and the race to raise digital skills.

  1. As New Yorker cartoons used to quip, “Change is getting ahead of us all.” Some new norms are easy to adopt, though I recall a German girlfriend who wouldn’t rent a car with automatic transmission, because she “didn’t know what to do with it”.

    These days the logic of change is even less intuitive than it once was. “Where to click” baffles everyone at first, because there is no detectable mechanical connection between what you do and what happens. This scares half-to-death anyone not brought up with a toddler tablet.

    Adult learning is always frightening, because it comes from the need not to fail. But necessity, it seems, is the mother of comprehension. And nothing focuses the mind like the prospect of death …

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